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Posts Tagged ‘social media for lawyers’

Synchronicity, Plum Pudding and the Twitterverse

Yesterday, I was taken by the notion that I should acknowledge my 9000th Twitter follower with a blog-post, whoever he or she …or it …may be.

Serendipitous? Risky? ….Well, yes. After all, it may be a nutter or a liberal, a poker or golf freak or indeed a twitterbot. In all probability it would be.

Nevertheless, the die was cast. The rule was set.

I resolved to blog on follower 9000 whoever he, she or it turned out to be. No tricks. No poetic licence.

It was to be a gesture intended as a thankful celebration of the glorious and provoking arbitrariness of the Twitterverse.

Blawg Review #243

Welcome to the Blawg Review #243 from a sunny, snow-covered London.

Fighting Back: A Festive Meditation for Lawyers

The Physical Unverse tends towards chaos and dissolution …the Moral Universe towards injustice and despair ….the Legal Universe, for surely such a dimension does exist, towards obfuscation, misdirection and delay.

But there is a contrary principle.

candle

…the Light shines in the darkness and the darkness comprehends it not.

So let us declare this contrary principle that it may burn ever brighter and more unquenchable in the minds and hearts of all who practise the Law. 

‘Social Media for Lawyers:Twitter Edition’ Please RT

Adrian Dayton’s timely book on Twitter for the Legal Profession:   Social Media for Lawyers: Twitter Edition  is a ‘must-read’ for all law  firms.

Indeed, it should be studied avidly, not only by lawyers, but also by any professional service firm that wants to grow its business fast using Web 2.0 techniques.

As a successful New York attorney turned social media guru, Dayton deals with his subject comprehensively and with an easy authority.

He begins by dismissing, with an unanswerable charm, the main excuses that the legal profession commonly gives for avoiding Twitter. Indeed, in a world where the High Court in London has recently authorised the service of formal legal proceedings by Twitter, it is difficult to understand how anyone can now fail to see the relevance of Twitter to the legal profession.